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HomeGlobal NewsTungabhadra River: Lifeline Of Southern India’s Ecology And Culture - News18

Tungabhadra River: Lifeline Of Southern India’s Ecology And Culture – News18



News18

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Tungabhadra River is widely known for its scenic beauty.

Tungabhadra River is widely known for its scenic beauty.

The name, Tungabhadra, comes from the confluence of two rivers, Tunga, about 147 km (91 mi) long and Bhadra, about 178 km (111 mi) long.

India boasts a vast network of rivers, each playing a vital role in the country’s ecology and culture. The Tungabhadra River is one such prominent river contributing significantly to the Southern Indian peninsula. The name comes from the confluence of two rivers, Tunga, about 147 km (91 mi) long and Bhadra, about 178 km (111 mi) long. The Tunga and Bhadra Rivers originated on the eastern slopes of the Western Ghats. The two rivers merge at Koodli which flows down in Karnataka’s Shimoga district, giving birth to the Tungabhadra River.

The river after the confluence of the two streams, runs for about 531 kilometres till it joins the Krishna River at Andhra Pradesh’s Sangamaleshwaram. It then runs for 382 km (237 mi) in Karnataka and forms the boundary between Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh for 58 km (36 mi) and further runs 91 km (57 mi) in Andhra Pradesh.

Meanwhile, as per Hindu Mythology, the Tungabhadra River was created by Lord Brahma, the creator of the universe. Once Lord Brahma was performing a yajna (a sacrificial ritual) on the banks of the river and the river was created out of the sacred fire of the yajna. Some say that it was created by Lord Shiva after he hit the ground with his trident.

Amid lush green forests, rocky terrain, and picturesque valleys, the river is a popular tourist destination for tourists and is widely known for its scenic beauty. The river has several dams and reservoirs built on it, including the Bhadra Dam, the Tunga Anicut Dam, the Hemavathy Dam, and the Tungabhadra Dam. The river is regarded as an important source of water for irrigation, drinking, and industrial purposes.

The river basin is home to several crops, including rice, cotton, sugarcane, and oilseeds. The waters also have several fish species in it benefitting the fishing industry. In addition to this, the Tungabhadra River basin is rich in mineral resources such as iron ore, manganese, and bauxite.

Adding to the beauty of the river, a herd of rare otters were recently spotted in the river near the jack well of Rajanahalli village in Harihar taluk, reported Asianet Newsable.



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